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Abstaining from blood and things strangled...


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#1 Jeremy

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 01:27 PM

In case you missed the news, the world black pudding-throwing championships have just taken place. BBC News article here.

Should make you smile, as it did me. This is what people get up to in and around Manchester, folks!

It includes a short description of a black pudding, which is enough to put you off for life. :yuk:

#2 Dawn

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 03:35 PM

If as Christians we want to "do well" we are well to consider whether eating black pudding is forbidden to Christians under Acts 15. Disgusting stuff (though quite delicious when it is fried and ate it years ago, but I could not eat it now as it is pure pigs blood and fat).

Fancy Mancunians doing THAT! I don't know, what is the world coming to!!!

#3 Adanac

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 03:40 PM

If we were Gentiles living in the days of Acts 15, yes it would be forbidden. But if we think that's all that Acts 15 is talking about and miss the spirit of it then we're heading down the wrong track.

It's the same thing as with thing like "don't boil a kid in its mother's milk" - a law in Exodus 34. This law has nothing to do with boiling a kid in its mother's milk. Instead it is a law about separating yourself from the practices of the pagan nations round about. They used to boil kids in their mothers' milk as part of their religious observances and Exodus 34 is saying "don't do that". The Jews with the kosher laws have missed the point.

Likewise with avoiding blood outlined in Acts 15. It's nothing to do with eating blood: it's about separating yourself (if you were in the first century) from pagan religious practices.

We need to learn to apply the spirit of that to our day and age otherwise we do indeed completely miss the point.

#4 Dawn

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 03:49 PM

I take your point, but isn't the Word of God applicable for all ages?

But then maybe it's down to interpretation: I do interpret avoiding blood as referring to the Noahic "law" of not eating blood rather than idolatry. To me, eating black pudding is pagan anyhow. Because it trangresses a basic direction by God to avoid blood.

The Torah was read in the synagogue every Sabbath, so for me Acts 15 is linked to the Torah.

But it is uncertain detail.

#5 Adanac

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:16 PM

Superstition is a subtle thing and here's an example. Yes of course the Bible is applicable for all ages, but does that mean, for example, that we're meant to be offering unblemished lambs on altars?

Of course not.

So why do you think there is anything inherently sinful about eating blood? It's just stuff. The more we go down the route of following the letter of the law without the spirit the more we shall fall into apostasy.

I would like to labour this point because I think it is fundamental and important and not "down to interpretation". There was a booklet some time ago called "Necessary Things" produced by the Nazarene Fellowship, a split-off from Christadelphians. All the booklet did was betray the superstitous and cultic religion that splinter groups always display.

It's this sort of thing that destroys the meaning of true religion and turns our lives into "taste not, touch not" spiritually dead people.

Now eating blood may be a silly thing to do - something which is lawful (because it's just a thing) but not expedient (for health reasons) and God gave those Noahic laws for a purpose, just as he told Israel not to eat pork because if you don't cook it well then it's bad for you. But people usually miss both important points (a) and (b) below and just look at © which was never the intention.

(a) God gave laws to separate his people from pagan nations and make them healthy living people.

(b) God gave laws to teach us principles.

© God gave laws because certain things are inherently sinful.

© is true, obviously, in some cases, but in actual fact is redundant once (a) is acknowledged. E.g. fornication. We might think it's © but in actual fact it's (a) without the need for ©. But much religion is so © based that it abrogates faith because life is all about avoiding unclean things and we miss the point of the law (b) and misunderstand holiness and care of God for his people (a). That then comes out in our actions towards others where we set up a religious institution that is condemns our fellows for, e.g., eating blood and we aren't truly holy and we aren't caring people and we don't understand the principles of God one iota.




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