Jump to content


Photo

Christological Definitions


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
2 replies to this topic

#1 Evangelion

Evangelion

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • 24,344 posts
  • LocationAdelaide, South Australia

Posted 28 December 2002 - 12:23 AM

  • Trinitarianism:
    God is one being Who consists of three persons (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), each of whom must be recognised individually as "Lord and God."

  • Arianism:
    God is one being Who consists of one person (the Father.) Beside him there exists a second being (Jesus), who was created by God, and through whom He created the world. Jesus is not God - nor is he "another God" - but rather, a form of super-angel.

  • Modalism:

    Ancient Modalism.
    God is one being Who consists of one person (the Father), but reveals Himself to the world as if He is actually more than one person. During the Old Testament times, he revealed Himself as the Father; during His ministry on Earth, He revealed Himself as the Son; after Christ's ascension, He revealed Himself as the Holy Spirit, dwelling in all true believers.


    Modern Modalism.
    God is one being Who consists of one person (Jesus), but uses different titles (Father, Son, Holy spirit) to describe various aspects of His work with His creation. (The modern form of Modalism is commonly known as "Oneness Theology.") Both forms of Modalism are Monarchian, because they defend the concept of God as a single Divine person.

  • Adoptionism:

    As Defined by Elipandus and Felix (8th Century.)

    From the Catholic Encyclopaedia:
    • This, the original form of Adoptionism, asserts a double sonship in Christ: one by generation and nature, and the other by adoption and grace. Christ as God is indeed the Son of God by generation and nature, but Christ as man is Son of God only by adoption and grace. Hence "The Man Christ" is the adoptive and not the natural Son of God.
    Adoptionism is also known (erroneously, according to the Catholic Encyclopaedia) as Dynamic Monarchianism. Some Adoptionists believed that the Son was a mortal man who was later absorbed into the Godhead and became God himself; others believed that he was merely exalted to a divine state above the angels. Both believed that Jesus did not become the Son until his baptism - a teaching that Christadelphians categorically reject.


    As Defined by Abelard (12th Century.)

    From the Catholic Encyclopaedia:
    Abelard began to question the truth of such expressions as "Christ is God"; "Christ is man". Back of what might seem a mere logomachy there is really, in Abelard's mind, a fundamental error. He understood the hypostatical union as a fusion of two natures, the divine and the human. And lest that fusion become a confusion, he made the sacred Humanity the external habit and adventitious instrument of the Word only, and thus denied the substantial reality of "The Man Christ" -- "Christus ut homo non est aliquid sed dici potest alicuius modi." It is self-evident that in such a theory the Man Christ could not be called the true Son of God.

    As Defined by Later Theologians.

    From the Catholic Encyclopaedia:
    The formulas "natural Son of God", "adopted Son of God" were again subjected to a close analysis by such theologians as Duns Scotus (1300); Durandus a S. Portiano (1320); Vasquez (1604); Suarez (1617). They all admitted the doctrine of Frankfort, and confessed that Jesus as man was the natural and not merely the adoptive Son of God.

    But besides that natural sonship resting upon the hypostatical union, they thought there was room for a second filiation, resting on grace, the grace of union (gratia unionis). They did not agree, however, in qualifying that second filiation. Some called it adoptive, because of its analogy with our supernatural adoption. Others, fearing lest the implication of the word adoption might make Jesus a stranger to, and alien from God, preferred to call it natural.

  • Unitarianism:

    Biblical Unitarianism - as Defined by Judaism.
    God is one being Who consists of one person - the Father. The Messiah is the Son of God, but not God Himself, nor even a pre-existent being.


    Biblical Unitarianism - as Defined by the 1st Century Christians.
    God is one being Who consists of one person - the Father. Jesus Christ is the Son of God; a mortal man (who did not exist before his conception and subsequent birth), conceived by the Holy Spirit, who later received immortality and divine nature. Even now he is still not God, but rather, an exalted man.

    Thus, in the words of the apostle Peter,
    God hath made the same Jesus, whom ye crucified, both Lord and Christ.
    Also,
    ...Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: Whom God hath raised up.
    And again, in the words of the apostle Paul,
    For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus...
    Biblical Unitarians are distinguished from Rationalist Unitarians by their strict adherence to Sola Scriptura and their belief that Scripture is both inspired and inerrant. Christadelphians are Biblical Unitarians.


    Rationalist Unitarianism.
    God is one being Who consists of one person - the Father. Jesus is not the Son of God, but merely a "good and wise man" who taught others how to lead a better life. Rationalist Unitarianism emerged from the German Rationalism of the 19th Century. Its proponents took a highly intellectual approach to religion, rejecting most of the miraculous events in the Bible (including the virgin birth.) They embraced evolutionary concepts, asserted the "inherent goodness of man", and abandoned many principles of Christianity. James Martineau (1805-85) was one of their most prominent members.


    Universalist Unitarianism.
    There is no formal creed or set of beliefs for the UU Church, but it does possess three fundamental doctrines which cannot be revoked: that God is one being Who consists of one person (the Father), that Jesus Christ is His Son, and that all humanity will be reconciled to God, regardless of their current beliefs.

'Abba Antony said, "A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, 'You are mad, you are not like us.'"'

Ward, Benedicta. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (2006), Antony 25, p. 5.

Credo.

#2 Marv_*

Marv_*

    Epsilon

  • Non-Members
  • PipPip
  • 25 posts

Posted 01 January 2003 - 03:56 AM

"Modalism"...

Not meaning to dispute with you, EV, .... but only "seeking clarification". Was not "modalism" originally called "Monarchianism"...and in it's ancient beginnings (early centuries AD).... splintered into "Dymamic Monarchianism" which believed One person of God.... and Modal-Monarchianism, which believed in One God in 3 modes... father, son, holy spirit (similar to modern day "oneness") .... ?????
{there seems to be a delegate balance between "asking" and "disputing", doesnt there? ;)

#3 Evangelion

Evangelion

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • 24,344 posts
  • LocationAdelaide, South Australia

Posted 01 January 2003 - 05:19 AM

Marv -

"Modalism"...

Not meaning to dispute with you, EV, .... but only "seeking clarification". Was not "modalism" originally called "Monarchianism"...and in it's ancient beginnings (early centuries AD).... splintered into "Dymamic Monarchianism" which believed One person of God.... and Modal-Monarchianism, which believed in One God in 3 modes... father, son, holy spirit (similar to modern day "oneness") .... ?????


Modalism is actually a form of Monarchianism, while "Dynamic Monarchianism" is actually the ancient name for Biblical Unitarianism. For more on this subject, see here.

{there seems to be a delegate balance between "asking" and "disputing", doesnt there?


LOL, true.

Let's call this "clarification." :rolleyes:
'Abba Antony said, "A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, 'You are mad, you are not like us.'"'

Ward, Benedicta. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (2006), Antony 25, p. 5.

Credo.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users