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#1 violin

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:45 AM

In putting together a brief discussion paper on "courtesy - an under-rated virtue" I cam across the following comments on the word πραυτες which is translated "courtesy" in 1 Peter 3v16 in the NET Bible (but as "gentleness" / "meekness" or similar elsewhere). Would anyone with access to a modern lexicon be able to comment please?

Famed Scottish New Testament scholar of an era gone by, Professor William Barclay, once
said that this word translated as “meek” is perhaps the poorest example of translation work ever
shown in bringing a word or a passage from Greek into English. A Greek, Greek scholar, Spiros
Zodhiates, tries to enlighten us. He begins with Aristotle’s understanding of the word as used in
classical or high brow Greek. According to the brilliant Aristotle, prautes (πραυτες) meant:
...the middle standing between two extremes, getting angry without reason and not getting angry
at all. Therefore, prautes is getting angry at the right time, in the right measure, and for the
right reason. . . . [I]t is a condition of mind and heart that demonstrates gentleness, not in
weakness, but in power. It is a balance born in strength of character.


(source http://silversidechu...us_meekness.pdf)

The verse is just really a springboard for a wider discussion of "courtesy" (as in "politeness/ etiquette") in general, but I would be glad to have a picture of what Peter might have meant other than from Strongs!

Thanks

#2 Evangelion

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:14 PM

πραΰτης (prautēs), ητος (ētos), ἡ (hē): n.fem.; ≡ Str 4240; TDNT 6.645—LN 88.59 gentleness, meekness, humility (1Co 4:21; 2Co 10:1; Gal 5:23; 6:1; Eph 4:2; Col 3:12; 2Ti 2:25; Tit 3:2; Jas 1:21; 3:13; 1Pe 3:16+)

James Swanson, Dictionary of Biblical Languages With Semantic Domains: Greek (New Testament) (electronic ed.; Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997).


πραΰτης, ητος f; πραϋπαθία, ας f: gentleness of attitude and behavior, in contrast with harshness in one’s dealings with others—‘gentleness, meekness, mildness.’

Johannes P. Louw and Eugene Albert Nida, vol. 1, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition.; New York: United Bible Societies, 1996), 748.


πραΰτης prautēs; from 4239b; gentleness:—consideration(1), gentleness(8), humility(1), meekness(1).

Robert L. Thomas, New American Standard Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries: Updated Edition (Anaheim: Foundation Publications, Inc., 1998).


:book:
'Abba Antony said, "A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, 'You are mad, you are not like us.'"'

Ward, Benedicta. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (2006), Antony 25, p. 5.

Credo.

#3 violin

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 12:51 AM

Thanks!

#4 Evangelion

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 01:43 AM

:welcome:

A Greek, Greek scholar, Spiros Zodhiates, tries to enlighten us. He begins with Aristotle’s understanding of the word as used in classical or high brow Greek.


Zodhiates is a fine scholar, but I see no reason why we should take a meaning from classical Greek and impose it onto Koine Greek. The two forms are different for a reason.

Aristotle also uses the word morphe in a different way, but there's no good reason for imposing his meaning of the word onto Philippians 2:6. It's just bad exegesis.
'Abba Antony said, "A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, 'You are mad, you are not like us.'"'

Ward, Benedicta. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (2006), Antony 25, p. 5.

Credo.




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